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Black British Soldiers – The Forgotten Fighters

Wed, May 3 1995 – Guardian

Caribbean Soldiers from WW2
Caribbean Soldiers from WW2

Black Soldiers in WW2

In the early years of the second world war, Britain made frequent requests for help from its colonies. One man to respond was Billy Strachan. Like most Jamaicans at the time he regarded Britain as his homeland, and enlisting it seemed a natural option.

“I went to the British Army camp in Jamaica to ask about being sent to Britain to join the R.A.F, but I was laughed at and told to find my own way there”.

he recalls.

“I then went to the Jamaica Fruits Shipping company, which had some boats coming from Britain four of the middle class white people fleeing from the war, and persuaded them to let me have a passage back for £15. I didn’t have £15, so I sold my bicycle and saxophone to raise the fair”.

On arrival in Britain Strachan had no idea how to enlist, and so he headed off to the Air Ministry in London.

“I hadn’t heard about the recruiting stations and the guards thought I was taking the Mickey when I said I wanted to join up. Luckily, a Hooray Henry, Officer type, overheard us and said: “oh you’re from Jamaica, one of our colonial friends. Welcome. I did geography  at university and I’ve always been impressed by you West Africans.” Thanks to his supreme ignorance I was dragged in, and was eventually sent to the RAF unit in Euston for a medical.”

Caribbean Pilots in WW2

Billy Strachan went on to serve both as an Air Gunner and pilot for Bomber Command, and was a member of the only crew of 99 Bomber Squadron to finish a tour of 30 trips alive.

Once the war ended many black servicemen felt that their efforts were one appreciated.

“It was as if it was okay but was to be over here while there was an emergency, but in 1945 we weren’t wanted any more,”

says Laurent Philpotts, Public Relations Officer for the West Indian ex-service men and women’s association.

After I was demobbed in Nottingham a Padre said to me: “When are you going home?” I was shocked; if a Padre could say that, what must everyone else to be thinking?”

Black Ex Servicemen feel neglected

50 years on, nothing much has changed. Black ex-servicemen still feel neglected by the military establishment and believe they are not afforded the same privileges and facilities as veterans from the white Commonwealth countries. Last year they felt snobbed at not being included in the D-Day Commemorations, and it has only been through a last-minute interventions from leading black figures, such as Bernie Grant, that has ensured invitations for the V.E.Day have been extended to the Gov. Gen. of Jamaica and the president of Trinidad.

The old black British soldiers have not been so lucky. Earlier this year and the West Indian ex-service men and women’s association was sent some forms inviting its members to apply for seating at the VE day commemorative events, but none has been successful. Unsurprisingly, the Association has decided to hold its own commemorative program. Since the vast majority of black and Asian veterans were fighting in the “Forgotten” war in Burma, Malaya and Africa, and most accounts of the war have been written from a Eurocentric perspective by white historians, there has been an inbuilt tendency to discount the contribution in their literature.

Yet, even in those books which focus on the campaigns in which black and Asian troops were involved, there has been a predisposition to be little better role. Colonel Ismail Khan who served with the Indian Army in Malaya has particularly strong feelings about this.

“There is always the sense that the Indian troops weren’t quite as good as the British, and the writers have tended to easy to ignore their efforts or to contend them by attacking their fighting spirit or exaggerating the desertions.”

For those children whose grandparents ER either dead or living overseas, the opportunities for learning even an oral history are extremely limited. Many black and Asian ex-servicemen now recognise that they have a responsibility to write their own history.

One institution firmly behind such moves is the Imperial War Museum. Anita Ballin: the museums education officer, says:

“There is material on the black war effort here at the moment, but you have to look pretty hard to find it, and many people have asked for more information.” In response to such requests the museum has assembled in multimedia resource pack entitled to gather for use in schools and which will also be available through public libraries. Ballin hopes that it is just the first step. “In time I would like the Museum to stage either a special exhibition or for more material to be included in the permanent displays.”

Such efforts are more than welcome, but the black and Asian ex-servicemen realise that it will take a great deal more to shift the underlying attitudes.

During the war, and black people were still a comparatively rare sight in this country, the racism they encountered was minimal, but that soon changed in the post war years. While the rest of Britain set about building a country fit for heroes, black people found that the country for which they had fought was denying them access to equal jobs and accommodation. “It seem as if no sooner had one to many and then another began,” says Laurent Phillpotts. “But just like the last war it’s a battle we are slowly winning.”

Related Articles on this site

Black soldiers in the British Armed Forces – John Ellis
Africans in Wartime Propaganda – Part 1
Related links
Imperial War Museum – Online Collection – Jamaican
Imperial War Museum – Online collection –  African Soldiers
We also served 

 

14 thoughts on “Black British Soldiers – The Forgotten Fighters

  • 20th December 2011 at 5:09 am
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    Hi i have read the above article with interest, i cannot undo the past but the present i can and will change. I am currently the Birmingham County Chairman of the Royal British Legion and for six months i have been very pro active with supporting the West Indian Regiments Standards and have included their participation at all of the Events being held in the City. I can say that fellow veterans have warmly received and recognised the efforts and sacrifice of the West Indian and Asian past and present service. This year the Standards have been paraded with the dignity and sombre reflection of past sacrifice. Next year i will be pushing forward and hope to have the West Indian Regiment Standards on duty at the Royal Albert Hall.
    Keep up the good work

    Reply
    • 10th November 2013 at 7:23 am
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      Just watching the parade on TV and not one black veteran has been included in the parade, absolutely disgusting.

      Reply
    • 11th November 2014 at 2:04 pm
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      David thanks for being part of the solution for this egregious omission of courage by black soldiers. I look forward to seeing change in this lifetime.

      Reply
  • 23rd June 2013 at 10:33 am
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    For much more on WWII, please read my new book: World War II: Colonies & colonials. This looks at military, financial and other contributions, the ‘Home Fronts’ in terms of political activism and jailings etc, both in the colonies (incl. India) and in the UK. It ends with the beginnings of the post-war struggles for independence.

    £6 incl. p&p. Please email me.

    Reply
  • 21st April 2015 at 5:06 am
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    I watch the A H C , History channel, etc, & have never seen a Black face in the British military on any program that pertains to WW II. Why do u never see a black fighting for the Brits ?Pl . explain!

    Reply
    • 7th August 2016 at 6:59 am
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      because they didn’t see any action in EU on ground. only real sport been parts middle east Africa. they never allow man from other country’s onto there land. France still does it to day with there foreign legion

      Reply
      • 7th November 2016 at 5:00 pm
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        Well Kenneth Roberts of the 21st Independant Parachute Company was black and was killed during OP Market Garden.

        Reply
  • 12th November 2015 at 11:30 am
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    Looking back at the old timers i was taken back. I knew 1000’s of black join the forces but you never hear a thing. When i see old books with black people in it i get very emotional. I was in the army join up in 1973 it was a hard choice for me coming from a family of 7 in a 3 bed in Stockwell South London it was tuff. Carry out my Schooling in South london a school by the name of Kennington School in White Horse. I had a primitive education I get by.

    My Days in the forces was good I enjoy learning new skills and put those skills to good use. But after that was over I felt let down, I had nowhere to turn, had no one in my corner. During the time in the forces I found a lovely and caring lady we was young and in love we decided to have a family she was in East London and I was in Ireland we had to work hard at the relationship, we had a son. I made it on my own pushing the army behind me, and got on with my life.

    Reply
  • 26th February 2016 at 3:25 pm
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    I am very disturb to here of these shocking stories of black servicemen.I joined the Army in 1962 in Barbados .Done my training in Hampshire and Warwickshire before being posted to Cyprus and then Germany.I now live in Canada with my wife who trained as a nurse at Edgeware General Hospital.I talk about the Army daily and all the good things that I received but these kind of stories are shocking .Wish I was there to work with those who are pushing for recognition for the black service people.

    Reply
    • 7th August 2016 at 7:05 am
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      he ddint do anything big or great why would they talk about him? tons white guys they dont talk about them! if you want talk about you have to do something great. India guy British army attacked 3 Japanese troops got staved with a sword pulled killed 5 of them ran miles back to camp and made a report to the officer!! was first none britsh person get a high medal!

      Reply
  • 9th March 2016 at 2:59 pm
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    I am now just qualifying as a teacher and my aim in life is to provide a Black Curriculum. This gives a voice to the invisible and those marginalised by indirect and direct racism. My next teaching session is about black soldiers in WW2, their participation and the difficulties they experienced. It is never right to collude with racism in all its abhorrent forms, its time to stand up and be counted. Black soldiers men and women in the british forces have a right to their history as they would remember and document it. Not for the white privileged to tell it how they see it. Spread the word.

    Reply
    • 7th August 2016 at 7:01 am
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      stfu with that white privileged shit! they dont talk about them because they didn’t do anything at all idiot. dont talk about all white boys every battle just big informants ones. whites from other countrys they hated and dont talk about or give credit to. how about this one talk about blacks in the WAFFEN SS

      Reply
  • 24th May 2016 at 1:03 pm
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    Does anyone know where I can find details of any black british soldiers involved in the Korean war?

    Reply
  • 18th October 2016 at 10:46 pm
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    I’ve just read this as I was reading a article on my late grandfather….. and I am glad to say I was brought up in east London and have friends and family of every race…. and was honoured to meet many of his fellow comrades or brothers…. and all through my school days been educated enough to know how important every person and country was to making life as we know it happen….. and my grandad george ‘sandy’ ferris a commando who enlisted because his home life was so tuff didn’t talk much about the fighting but of the honour of the Gurkhas and the pilots of from the West Indies and the bravery of the Indian army….like a lot of important history it will be forgot or not remembered but to some of us your British heroes

    Reply

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