Tag Archive | "Kelso Cochrane"

No Justice No Peace – Racial Justice in Britain


No Justice – No Peace: By Lee Pinkerton.  Original article published on The Blak Watch
Looking at the Stephen Lawrence verdict and racial justice in Britain.

“There’s no such thing as freedom in this country for a Black man. There’s no such thing as justice in this country for a Black man.”

Malcolm X

“I had to go to court the other day. You go there looking for justice and that’s what you find – just us!”

Richard Pryor.

The guilty verdicts obtained in the Stephen Lawrence murder trial came as a surprise to many Black commentators, myself included. And why would it come as a surprise? The verdicts came as a surprise because even a cursory glance through the history of Black people in Britain uncovers a litany of racial violence and an absence of justice. Sometimes the perpetrators are racist thugs and the events take place on the street. Quite often the perpetrators are the police themselves and the events happen in police custody, but the outcome is the same – the perpetrators go free.

Doreen and Neville Lawrence

Doreen and Neville Lawrence

The tireless Neville & Doreen Lawrence

Let me take you on a quick tour of Britains racial injustice of the last 50 years.

As soon as Caribbean immigrants arrived in Britain en-mass in the 1950’s we were met with intolerance, racism and violence. The first high profile murder came in 1959.

On 17 May 1959 young Antiguan Kelso Cochrane was knifed to death in west London in a racist attack. The police tried to dampen down the issue, claiming that it was a robbery and not a racist attack. Local black people knew different, fascist inspired gangs had operated in the area for some time. There was a conspiracy of silence which meant that his killers, to this day, have not been brought to justice. It was in response to this racial tension and climate of fear inspired a show of strength, solidarity and cultural pride that led to the birth of the Notting Hill Carnival.

Ten years later a young Nigerian student became a fatal victim of racist violence and this time the Police themselves were the suspects.

David Oluwale came to England from Nigeria in 1949 with dreams of studying to be an engineer in Leeds. In 1953 Oluwale was charged with disorderly conduct and assault following a police raid on a nightclub.

He subsequently served a 28-day sentence. In prison it was reported he suffered from hallucinations, possibly because of damage sustained from a truncheon blow during the arrest. He was transferred to Menston Asylum in Leeds (now called High Royds Hospital) where he spent the next eight years.

Upon release Oluwale was unable to hold down a job and a permanent residence, and quickly became homeless. He found himself in trouble with the Leeds police again several times and accused the police of harassing him.

In April 1969 his dead body was found in the River Aire. A year later an enquiry was launched, carried out by Scotland Yard, and sufficient evidence was gathered to prompt manslaughter, perjury and grievous bodily harm (GBH) charges being brought against two police officers (Ellerker and Kitching) in 1971. Ellerker was found guilty of three assaults against Oluwale and Kitching of two assaults. They were both found not guilty of causing GBH. Ellerker was sentenced to three years in prison, and Kitching received 27 months.

The 1970’s saw a rise in the prominence of the far right, National Front Party. The start of the 80’s saw one of the most tragic events and criminal scandals in Black British History.

The New Cross Fire 1981

 

The New Cross Fire

The New Cross Fire

 

 

The New Cross Fire was a devastating house fire which killed 13 young black people during a birthday party in New Cross, South East London on Sunday 18 January 1981. There had been early complaints about noise from the party and the initial police suspicion was that the party had been bombed either as a revenge attack or to stop the noise.

The inquest into the deaths saw criticism of the police. The coroner’s summary for the jury was heavily directed towards suggesting the fire was accidental, and the jury returned an open verdict which implied agreement. The victims’ families challenged the procedure and while the High Court agreed that the summing-up was inaccurate, it refused to overturn the verdict. Nobody has ever been charged in relation to the fire.

British Police and the Black Community

1985 was a particularly bad year for relations between the British Police and the Black community.
In September of that year the police conducted an armed search of the home of Cherry Groce seeking her son Michael Groce in relation to a suspected firearms offence – they believed Michael was hiding in his mother’s home. Mrs. Groce was in bed when the police began their search and Michael was not there at the time, but Mrs. Groce was hit by a police bullet – an injury which left her paralysed from the waist down. This event was the spark for the Brixton Riots of 1985. The police officer who shot Mrs. Groce, Inspector Douglas Lovelock, was prosecuted but eventually acquitted of malicious wounding. Mrs. Groce received compensation from the Metropolitan Police.

Brixton Riots 1981

Brixton Riots 1981

Brixton Riots 1985

The very next month a young black man, Floyd Jarrett, was arrested by police, having been stopped in a vehicle with an allegedly suspicious tax disc. Four police officers searched his home. In a disturbance between police and family members, his 49-year-old mother, Cynthia Jarrett, fell over and died of a stroke. Cynthia Jarrett’s death sparked outrage from members of the black community against the Metropolitan Police, and was the spark for the Broadwater Farm Riot. More commonly known as the Brixton riots of 1985

Rolan Adams

In February 1991 Black teenager Rolan Adams was fatally stabbed by a gang of more than a dozen white youths, in Thamesmead, south London.
 Many of the attackers were already known to the police as they regularly terrorised the local black community, so it was easy for the police to identify who they were and they were quickly arrested. One youth was tried and convicted for murder. Of the other 14 perpetrators: four eventually faced trial, but for the lesser offence of violent disorder. After much plea bargaining by their defence team they were convicted of the offence and sentenced to 120 hours community service.

Joy Gardner

Joy Gardner was a 40-year-old Black woman from Jamaica who was killed during a struggle with the police at her home in Crouch End, London. Joy had come to visit her mother, Myrna Simpson, in 1987, but had overstayed her 6 month visa.

In 1993 an immigration officer and police officers arrived at her home to serve a deportation notice. When Gardner refused, the police entered her home and struggled and fought with her. Police gagged and restrained Gardner using a body belt and wrapped 13 ft of tape around her head which they later claimed was to prevent her biting them. Gardner suffocated and subsequently fell into a coma. She later died in hospital. These events were witnessed by Gardner’s five year old son. The three police officers involved were found not guilty of manslaughter in 1995.

Joy Gardner

Joy Gardner

Roger Sylvester

On January 11, 1999, police arrived outside Roger Sylvester’s house as a result of a 999 emergency call. Two officers came to the house initially and found him naked in his front garden. Within minutes another six officers had arrived. The eight officers put Sylvester to the ground where he was handcuffed. Sylvester was detained under Section 136 of the Mental Health Act. Police officers told his family that he was restrained “for his own safety.”

According to one witness, Sylvester’s body was already limp when it was placed in the police van. He was taken to St Ann’s hospital and carried from the van to a private room where, still restrained, he was put on the floor by upwards of six police officers for nearly 20 minutes before being seen by a doctor. The officers, with the assistance of medical staff, tried to resuscitate him but he had sustained numerous injuries and remained in a coma at the Whittington hospital until his life support machine was switched off seven days later.

Azelle Rodney – shot six times in less than a second

Azelle Rodney

Azelle Rodney

24 year old Azelle Rodney was a back seat pasenger of a Volkswagon Golf travelling the streets of North London in April 2005, when the police performed what they call ‘a hard stop’. The car had been under surveillance for several hours before officers stopped it in Edgware. Police believed he was part of an armed gang who were on their way to rob a Columbian drugs gang. With this suspicion the Police could have arrested Rodney and the other occupants of the car before they even started their journey, but instead chose to allow them to start their drive across London.

Alternatively, the officers who had been following Rodney’s car covertly, could have switched on their lights and siren when making the stop so that they could clearly have been indentified as officers. Instead, within seconds of the Police surrounding the car, Rodney was shot six times by an armed officer who offered no verbal warning. Two other occupants of the car were later convicted for firearms offences, but there was no evidence that Mr Rodney was holding a weapon at the time of the shooting. True to form an investigation by the IPCC exonerated the Police, and the Crown Prosecution Service decided there was no criminal case for the police to answer. Seven years later in 2012 a public inquiry was opened instead of an inquest because a coroner would not have been able to see some of the evidence that Police say was behind their actions.

Frank Ogburo

Frank Ogburo was 43 and was on a brief tourist visit to London to see friends in September 2006. The police were called by a neighbour when he was involved in a domestic altercation in the friend’s flat where he’d been staying in Woolwich. Eye-witnesses saw a struggle between the officers and Frank which resulted in him being sprayed with CS Gas, being handcuffed and brought to the floor. As the struggle on the floor continued more people gathered. Frank Ogburo was heard to shout “you’re killing me, I can’t breathe”. CCTV footage captured several more officers joining in the restraint and striking Frank to subdue him. By this point Frank’s wrists were in handcuffs behind his back. His death according to the jury at the inquest was as a “consequence of restraint”.

Bringing us up to date events of last year illustrate that little has changed.

The Death of Smiley Culture

On March 15th 2011 Police conducted a search at the home of David Emmanuel aka reggae artist Smiley Culture. Whilst Police were at the property Smiley Culture sustained a single stab wound to the chest, from which he later died. An investigation into the Police operation was conducted by the IPCC and found no evidence that a crime had been committed, and no misconduct by Police officers. An inquest into Smiley’s death will be held infront of a jury and will not take place before the conclusion of the trials to which Smiley was allegedly linked.

Smiley Culture

Smiley Culture

Mark Duggan Shot by Police

Mark Duggan

Mark Duggan

 

29, was a passenger in a minicab when on Thursday August 4th 2011 he was shot dead in the street by police. The death occurred during an operation where specialist firearm officers and officers from Operation Trident, were attempting to carry out an arrest. It was at first announced that Mr Duggan had been shot after an apparent exchange of fire. Later the IPCC admitted it may have misled journalists into believing Mr Duggan fired at officers before he was killed.

In November 2012, 2 members of the community group set up by the IPCC to oversee the enquiry of Mark Dugan‘s death stepped down alleging a cover up and whitewash.

What’s changed for Black Britons?

So does the Lawrence verdict represent the turning of a new page in British justice, and a new chapter in the Black British experience, or is it just a blip achieved only through the tirelessness and tenacity of Neville and Doreen Lawrence? After this anomaly will it be back to (racist) business as usual?

Though the apologists say that relations between the Police and Black people are much better than they were back in the day, the truth is that little has changed. In the 1980’s it was the hated ‘Sus’ law that caused tension between the Police and young Black men – now its Section 60 powers. Introduced in the 90’s to deal with football hooliganism, now its used to harass those who’ve never been to a football match. In 2010 there were 70,000 stops and searches in London alone. Analysis by the London School of Economics and the Open Society Justice Initiative shows that during the last 12 months a Black person was nearly 30 times more likely to be stopped and searched that a white person. And a separate analysis, based on Home Office data reveals that less that 0.5% of section 60 searches led to an arrest for possession of a dangerous weapon, five times fewer than a year ago. And then they wonder why so many young Black men hate the Police?

The death of Cynthia Jarret at the hands of the police led to the Tottenham Riots in 1985. The shooting of Cherry Groce by Police the same year led to the Brixton Riots. The shooting of Mark Duggan by the Police in 2011 led to the Tottenham Riots of the same year, and the general hostility towards the police by Black people, and feelings of alienation and hopelessness from the underclass took those riots nationwide. Watch carefully the outcome of the Azelle Rodney, Mark Duggan and Smiley Culture cases to see which way things are really going.

 

Further Reading:

The Stephen Lawrence Inquiry: Official documents

The Death Of Kelso Cochrane:  Operation Black Vote:

The New Cross Fire: BBC News

Stop and Search Experiences: Facebook

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Notting Hill and other stories – Part1


Notting Hill Carnival

Notting Hill Carnival

Greetings,

Time seems to have flown by since August last year when we saw images on our tv screens
of our communities again going up in flames after a Black man had died at the hands of the police.
It was a signal reminder of how quickly our memories dim when all the media outlets started
to howl about how shocked they were about these events and the fact that the people
at some of these locations seemed only interested in divesting
the local shops of their high value stock!

The nervous days that followed, not knowing where this fever would move to next,
is now in the hands of the Riot Communities and Victims Panel to investigate and report.
Led by Heather Rabbatts, this ‘Inquiry’ is looking into the causes and motivations of those
roused to do such ‘anti-social things’ and propose so responses. They spent some quality
time with us in Brixton a couple of weeks ago and have now gone on tour to the other affected areas,
istening diligently and asking poignant questions. But I’m sure that we’ve also forgotten the heart
searching discussion that took place among us,‘will there be a Notting Hill Carnival this year?’After a series
of tense meetings between the police and the organisers, the show went on and main stream newspapers representing the
view of middle England, reported in glowing terms about how thisunique festival had brought some balm to the nations very sore wounds.

They don’t have a sense of the history of carnival in general and Notting Hill Carnival
in particular. Nubian Jak, a ubiquitous heritage organisation emanating from within the
African and Caribbean community, had launched this years Carnival with a ceremony unveiling
two plaques to the matriarchs of carnival in the UK.

Firstly, Claudia Jones, who had inspired her organisation to respond to similarly
traumatic times for Black people, after the first Notting Hill Riots, when the white youth
gangs of the late 1950s, had attacked the newly settling community, that was mainly coming from
the Caribbean at that time, first in Nottingham and then in Notting Hill.

These communities initially responded by keeping a low profile and trying not to provoke a
greater violent response by matching fire with fire. The demographics of the places attacked,
were also characterised by people from quiet rural communities in the eastern
Caribbean. My father and other adult relatives, resident here at the time in Brixton and largely
drawn from Jamaica, reported to me later how their hearts bled as they read the reports in the newspapers
and heard the news on the radioabout the racists mobs,incited by demagogues like Sir Oswald Moseley,
continually laying siege to our fellow ‘West Indians’ nightly, in their homes. These were the experiences
that were forging a pan Caribbean mentality as we knew very little of each other before we arrived in Britain,
apart from when the West Indies beat England at cricket! But our solidarity ignited when we saw what was
happening to people who looked and acted like us for being different, so my father and his cohorts
decided to mobilise. Not for them were quietwords and understated gestures. Most of those people,
because women participated in this fightback, as I’ve seen photographs of a woman with a large machete
standing on the corner of Portobello Road waiting for the mob to arrive, armed themselves with similar
implements and set out to ‘The Grove’ to defend their kith and kin.

It was unsurprising that after a few skirmishes and some telling chops in crucial places,
that weren’t reported in the media, the mob decided that it wasn’t such a good idea to ‘attack the Blacks’.
Unfortunately, there would be one more fatal casualty before things finally petered out. Kelso Cochrane, an
Antiguan carpenter, migrant to Britain, trying to improve his economic circumstances, was attacked by a furtive gang, skulking in the shadows of Golbourne Bridge, while he was coming from home from work, late one evening.This solitary figure was set upon with bicycle chains, cut throat razors,truncheons and boots. He didn’t survive the experience andthe Notting Hill community of all kinds,the wider black community, and all good thinking people mourned and turned out in thousands for his funeral and march to his final resting place at Kensal Rise Cemetery. Unlike Roland Adams and Stephen Lawrence forty years later, no one was even identified for the murder.

Mainstream society finally realised that it had colluded too long with the fascism in its midst,
that it had defeated abroad during the 2nd World War. The Fleet Street media led by the Daily Mirror
and the West Indian Gazette, led by Claudia Jones, pleaded for justice and reconciliation. Claudia,
at an editorial board meeting of her paper, proposed, distilled from her Trinidadians roots,
that a Carnival be held to create a lighter and more convivial mood and to show British society another
side to our culture. This first carnival was held indoors as the organisers were not yet confident
enough to take it to the streets but it was televised to the early tv audience who saw for the first time,
something of what we were about. Institutions such as the Cy Grant nightly current affairs calypso, appeared on
BBC TV and fragments of the multi-cultural society started to emerge.

These indoor Carnivals continued until Claudia’s death five years later, when another immigrant,
this time from Eastern Europe,Rhaune Laslett, who was working as a community worker in the Notting Hill community,
decided with her organisation, that an event was needed to bring together the now burgeoning and diversifying
community of ‘The Grove’.They organised a Notting Hill Festival and invited all and sundry to participate and
the Trinidadian and other eastern Caribbean folk now resident there, brought out their pans and themselves
and turned it into a carnival.

The rest is history hence Nubian Jak’s gesture to honour the two women who had
initiated attempts at community reconciliation and cohesion using carnival as the medium.
Now this backdrop is to remind you of the context and role that carnival has played in the UK from the outset
and that it didn’t just do this last August. Unfortunately the police are not sufficiently au fait with this history
and I attach a People’s Account of events last Bank Holiday Monday, brought together by my old friend, Michael La Rose,(PART 2) chair of the George Padmore Institute and carnival veteran, erstwhile leader of the People’s War carnival band,setting the record straight. The authorities have got to get their heads screwed on the proper way round,if they are not to alienate the good citizens of their own society.
Inquiries, inquiries. Plus ca’ change.

D. Thomas
Devon C Thomas
The Griot

 

Tomorrow Read the:

experience of carnival spectators, stall holders , masqueraders and bandleaders at this years
Notting Hill Carnival 2011.

They share their accounts of the 6.30 shut down of music on the carnival route by the police,
policing of the event and the governance of Carnival 2011.

Posted in Black Britain, Black History, Black History Books, Black History Month UK, Black People in Europe, Caribbean HistoryComments (0)


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PjxzdHJvbmc+d29vX3ZpZGVvX2NhdGVnb3J5PC9zdHJvbmc+IC0gU2VsZWN0IGEgY2F0ZWdvcnk6PC9saT48L3VsPg==