Tag Archive | "Black Politicians"

Baroness Valerie Amos – Politician


Baroness Amos

Baroness Amos

Black Politician

Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, is a black Politician in the Labour Party (born 13 March 1954), is a British Labour Party politician and life peer.

Lady Amos was born in Guyana, studied at the Universities of Warwick, Birmingham and East Anglia, and was awarded an Honorary Professorship at Thames Valley University in 1995 in recognition of her work on equality and social justice.

After working in Equal Opportunities, Training and Management Services in local government in the London boroughs of Lambeth, Camden and Hackney, she became Chief Executive of the Equal Opportunities Commission 1989–94. In 1995 Amos co-founded Amos Fraser Bernard and was an adviser to the South African Government on public service reform, human rights and employment equity.

When she was appointed Secretary of State for International Development on May 12, 2003, following the resignation of Clare Short, she became the first female black politician to sit in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.

House of Lords

Lady Amos was the principal spokesperson in the House of Lords on International Development as well as one of the Government’s spokespersons in the House of Lords on Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. She was previously a Government Whip in the House of Lords from 1998 to 2001 and also a spokesperson on Social Security, International Development and Women’s Issues. She was created a life peer in August 1997.

Lady Amos has also been Deputy Chair of the Runnymede Trust 1990–98, a Trustee of the Institute of Public Policy Research, a non-executive Director of the University College London Hospitals Trust, a Trustee of Voluntary Services Overseas, Chair of the Afiya Trust, a director of Hampstead Theatre and Chair of the Board of Governors of the Royal College of Nursing Institute.  In 2003 Claire Short resigned from the Cabinet due to her views on the Iraq War, Valerie Amos replaced her becoming the first female black politician to sit in cabinet.

Lady Amos was made Leader of the House of Lords on October 6, 2003 following the death of Lord Williams of Mostyn, which meant that her tenure as Secretary of State for International Development lasted less than six months. Prior to her appointment as Secretary of State for International Development, Lady Amos was appointed Parliamentary Under-Secretary for Foreign & Commonwealth Affairs on June 11, 2001, with responsibility for Africa; Commonwealth; Caribbean; Overseas Territories; Consular Issues and FCO Personnel.

In the House of Lords, Lady Amos was a co-opted member of the Select Committee on European Communities Sub-Committee F (Social Affairs, Education and Home Affairs) 1997–98.

On 17 February 2005, the British government nominated her to head the United Nations Development Program. Her Tenure as leader of the House of Lords ran from 2003 -2007.

After Leaving Cabinet she worked as British High Commissioner to Australia until 2010.

In 2010 United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced the appointment of Valerie Amos, as
Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator.

In March 2012 she visited Syria on behalf of the UN to press the Syrian government to allow access to all parts of Syria to help people affected by the 2011-2012 Syrian uprising.


   

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Baroness Scotland – Politician


Baroness Scotland was created a peer as Baroness Scotland of Asthal, of Asthal in the County of Oxfordshire, in 1997 and was raised to the Privy Council in July 2001.

Baroness Scotland of Asthal QC was joint first, black woman peer.

Born in Dominica in 1956, and arrived in Britain at the age of 2 along with 10 other siblings.After graduating with LLB Hons (London), Patricia Scotland was called to the Bar, Middle Temple, in 1977.In 1991 she made legal history becoming the first black female QC (Queens Counsel) at the age of 35. She was made a bencher of the Middle Temple in 1997, becoming a judge in 1999,

Baroness Scotland

Baroness Scotland

Baroness Scotland becomes Parliamentary Secretary

Baroness Scotland became a Parliamentary Secretary at the Lord Chancellor’s Department on 11 June 2001. She was previously a Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, having being appointed to that post in 1999.

She is member of the Bar of Antigua and the Commonwealth of Dominica; was appointed a Recorder in 2000 and is approved to sit as a Deputy High Court Judge of the Family Division; she is a former member of the Commission for Racial Equality and served as a member of the Millennium Commission from 1994-99.

Baroness Scotland was created a peer as Baroness Scotland of Asthal, of Asthal in the County of Oxfordshire, in 1997 and was raised to the Privy Council in July 2001.

She married in 1985 and has two sons.

Related Links

http://www.parliament.uk/biographies/patricia-scotland/26608

 

   

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Mark Hendrick – Politician


Mark Hendrick

Mark Hendrick

Mark Hendrick is a black politician in the U.K house of Commens. He entered the Commons on November 24 2000. Many of his Commons interventions have been on European matters, where he has taken the opportunity to attack Conservative policy.

Mark Hendrick entered the Commons on November 24 2000, ‘Super Thursday’, when three separate by-elections were held.

He succeeded the left wing MP Audrey Wise – a matter of some controversy, since many local Labour members had wanted the former MP’s daughter to be the candidate.

Instead, Mr Hendrick, an electronics lecturer and a former MEP, won the nomination after being placed on the shortlist by the NEC.

He denied being a leadership pawn, saying: “I have my own views.”

Mark Hendrick was one of the second Wave of Black Politicians in the UK Since his election and re-election in 2001, many of his Commons interventions have been on European matters, where he has taken the opportunity to attack Conservative policy. (BBC)

Hendrick is Published, his works include,

  • Changing States by Mark Hendrick, 1995
  • The Euro and Co-operative Enterprise by Mark Hendrick, 1998

Related Links

Mark Hendrick’s welcome speech to the commons.

 

   

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Doug Brown – Stoke-on-Trent


Roy and Doug Brown

Roy and Doug Brown

Doug Brown & Roy Brown’s father, Eugene and his brother John came to England from the Ghana, West Africa, they were students. They decided to join the British Army when WW1 boke out.  John was killed and Eugene badly injured but after the war he got married and had two sons.  Eugene later died of his war injuries and the boys were raised by their mother, an English Woman from Stoke-on-Trent.

Roy Brown was a talented footballer and he was signed by Stoke City on leaving school at 14. The Second World War interrupted his football career although he did play for the club in the Football Regional League. He made his debut in 1941 and played a few games before joining the armed services.

Doug and Roy Brown in 1930s Stoke

Doug and Roy Brown in 1930s Stoke

The league did not resume until the 1946-47 season. Brown scored 14 goals in 74 games for Stoke City. In 1953 he was transferred to Watford in Division Three (South). Over the next few years he scored 40 goals in 142 games.

World War 2

During World War 2 Doug Brown trained as a physiotherapist to help in the recovery of injured soldiers. He continued this work in the newly formed National Health Service.

In 1960 Doug became the physio for Stoke City. His Brother, Roy had played for Stoke city as a young man.

In 1967 Doug set up the first “Lads-and-dads” matches on local school football pitches, which had previously been closed at weekends.
For his work with Lads and Dads he was nominated by Footballers Garth Crooks and Robbie Earle (Both originally from Stoke on Trent) for the BBC People’s Awards.

The same year Doug became an independent councillor, later joining the Labour Party.
He was appointed Lord Mayor in 1984 and then later helped to set up “Match Mates” to help combat Hooliganism. Princess Diana presented Doug with an award for his work in this area.

In 1997 he was appointed as Lord Mayor for the second time.

Doug Received an honorary degree from Keele University in recognition of his lifetime’s service to young people. He was a Justice of the Peace, President of the North Staffordshire Chinese Community.
Honorary member of the Grenadier Guards.Chairman of the board of governors at Sutherland primary school in Blurton (for 22 years).

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John Richard Archer – Britains first Black Mayor – 1913


John Richard Archer

John Richard Archer

John Richard Archer was Britain’s first black Mayor. He was also the first black person to hold Civic Office in Britain as Councillor, Alderman and then
mayor.

Archer was born in Liverpool in 1836 to a Barbadian father and an Irish mother. He settled in Battersea in London around 1890 with his black Canadian wife, there they opened an award winning photographic studio in Battersea Park Road.

Black Mayor of Battersea

Black Mayor of Battersea

He came to prominence as an outstanding public speaker when he supported John Burns in the 1905 General Election. Then, in 1906 he won the local election and became Britains first British born black Councillor. Until he was nominated there was no mention by the opposition parties of his colour. Later they used his race to
supposedly highlight the radical policies of Battersea’s working class tradition.

In 1913 he was elected the tenth Mayor of Battersea.

The night of his election he declaredYou have made history tonight..Battersea has done many things in it’s past, but the greatest thing that it has done is show that it has no colour predjudice, and that it recognizes a man for the work he has
done.

At the 1921 Pan African Congress he introduced Shapurji Saklatvala who was an Indian Communist to both the Labour party and the Communist
Party. John Richard Archer died in 1932.

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Baroness Valerie Amos-Politician


Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, PC (born 13 March 1954), was a British Labour Party politician and life peer, she served as Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council.

Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, PC (born 13 March 1954), is a British

Baroness Amos

Baroness Amos

Labour Party politician and life peer, served as Leader of the House of Lords and LordPresident of the Council.

When she was appointed Secretary of State for International Development on May 12, 2003, following the resignation of Clare Short, she became the first black woman to sit in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.

Lady Amos was made Leader of the House of Lords on October 6, 2003 following the death of Lord Williams of Mostyn, which meant that her tenure as Secretary of State for International Development lasted less than six months. Prior to her appointment as Secretary of State for International Development, Lady Amos was appointed Parliamentary

Under-Secretary for Foreign Commonwealth Affairs on June 11, 2001, with responsibility for Africa; Commonwealth; Caribbean; Overseas Territories; Consular Issues and FCO Personnel.

Lady Amos was the principal spokesperson in the House of Lords on International Development as well as one of the Government’s spokespersons in the House of Lords on Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs. She was previously a Government Whip in the House of Lords from 1998 to 2001 and also a spokesperson on Social Security, International Development and Women’s Issues. She was created a life peer in August 1997.

Lady Amos was born in Guyana, studied at the Universities of Warwick, Birmingham and East Anglia, and was awarded an Honorary Professorship at Thames Valley University in 1995 in recognition of her work on equality and social justice. After working in Equal Opportunities, Training and Management Services in local government in the London boroughs of Lambeth, Camden and Hackney, she became Chief Executive of the Equal Opportunities Commission 198994. In 1995 Amos co-founded Amos Fraser Bernard and was an adviser to the South African Government on public service reform, human rights and employment equity.

In the House of Lords, Lady Amos was a co-opted member of the Select Committee on European Communities Sub-Committee F (Social Affairs,

Education and Home Affairs) 199798. Lady Amos has also been Deputy Chair of the Runnymede Trust 199098, a Trustee of the Institute of Public Policy Research, a non-executive Director of the University College London Hospitals Trust, a Trustee of Voluntary Services Overseas, Chair of the Afiya Trust, a director of Hampstead Theatre and Chair of the Board of Governors of the Royal College of Nursing Institute.

On 17 February 2005, the British government nominated her to head the United Nations Development Program and is the eighth and current UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator.

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Bernie Grant – MP


 

Bernie Grant MP

Bernie Grant MP

 

The Late Bernie Grant was Britain’s foremost black spokesman, a champion of social and racial justice, and a pioneer for diversity.

Born in Guyana, and resident in Britain since 1963, Bernie Grant worked as a British Railways clerk,he was also National Union of Public Employees area officer, and as a partisan of the Black Trade Unionists Solidarity Movement.

In the political sphere he joined the Labour Party in 1975 and In 1987 was was elected to the British Parliament as one of the first black MP’s of modern times.

He shunned career advancement in favour of fearless campaigning on behalf of disadvantaged communities. Though regarded by the establishment as controversial, he came to be regarded as a people’s hero for his forthright stance against inequality in all its forms. His tireless efforts on behalf of Africa and the Caribbean region, and his insistence on the recognition of the past injustices of slavery and colonisation, earned him respect all over the world.

Grant had served for a decade of service as local councilor in the London Borough of Haringey, of which he was elected Leader in 1985. He was the first ever Black Leader of a local authority in Europe, and in this capacity had responsibility for an annual budget of some 163,500 million pounds, and the well-being of a quarter of a million people.

Bernie Grant brought to parliament a long and distinguished record as a leading campaigner against injustice and racism. He was a founder member of the Standing Conference of Afro-Caribbean and Asian Councilors and a member of the Labour Party Black Sections.

Grant was also a member of the National Executive of the Antiapartheid Movement in Britain, with a long-standing concern about the situation in Southern Africa. He also had a keen interest in the affairs of the Caribbean region, and of Central America, Ireland and Cyprus. He was also involved in efforts to tackle racism on a European wide level, in association with European Members of Parliament and European anti-racist group.

The Britain he found on arriving from Guyana in the early 1960′s, was a society ridden with prejudice, offering few opportunities for Bernie Grant quickly became involved in challenging racism wherever he found it. He used his position to speak out against discrimination in employment, in education, in policing, in public housing and against the racial stereotyping of young people.

Bernie, died of a heart Attack on 8 April 2000 , aged 56. his Wife sharon has wored tirelessly to set up the Bernie Grant Foundation and in September 2007 in Tottenham, London, Haringey Council opened the Bernie Grant Arts Centre in his name.

 

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Obama Wins Nobel Peace Prize


Nobel Peace Prize winner

Nobel Peace Prize winner

President Barack Obama won the Nobel Peace Prize on the 9th of October 2009. I what many see as a shock decision Obama was awarded the Prize for “his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and co-operation between peoples”.

Many observers publicly stated that they felt that it as “too early” in Mr Obamas Presidency for him to have won such an award. Mr Obama himself stated that he was “surprised and deeply humbled” by the award.

“His diplomacy is founded in the concept that those who are to lead the world must do so on the basis of values and attitudes that are shared by the majority of the world’s population.”

Head of the Nobel Committe Thorbjoern Jagland said the prize had been awarded to Mr Obama less than a year after he took office, “because we would like to support what he is trying to achieve”. “It is a clear signal that we want to advocate the same as he has done,” .

Mr Obama won 10m Swedish Krona for being selected as well as a special medal and diploma.

Despite it’s apparently premature presentation commentators the world over suggested that the award was presented to the President as a way to encourage him to strive more strongly for world peace, and the reduction of nuclear stockpiles.

Other US leaders to win are, Theodore Roosevelt who won the prize in 1906 and WoodrowWilson won it in 1919.The Nobel prize was invented by the Swedish industrialist and inventor of dynamite Alfred Nobel, and was first awarded in 1901.

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